An example search has returned 50 entries

-akwaiakwai

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v. make twine (by rolling on one’s leg or on one’s thigh)

-arɨs

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v intr laugh

akwéis

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adj. yellow

araii narek

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cut my penis( circumsision)

arpasuk

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v. bend down (imperative)

ia-kajia nerei

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v I scratch taro

karukwau

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n. interior house cross post

konuwak

konuwak
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Coral grouper, coral rock grouper

Example: Photo by J. E. Randall, License: CC BY-NC 3.0 via Fishes of Australia

konuwak arwerew

konuwak arwerew
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Coral hind, coral grouper (deep sea)

Example: Photo by Jan Messersmith, License: CC BY-SA 3.0 via Fishes of Australia

kurukuru

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n small stones, pebbles

kwanarai

kwanarai
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n. type of flowering plant (collection: Michael J. Balick #5147)

Example: Ripe fruits applied to paper and used as glue.

kwankwá-

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n. inalienable fruit, offpsring

kwenakwa

kwenakwa
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Red-bellied Fruit Dove

mai numɨri

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n. local tea leaves

mak irenha

mak irenha
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Tanna fruit dove

Example: Photo by Doug Janson / Wikimedia Commons, License: CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons

marao

marao
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Violet squirrelfish

Example: Photo by Jeffrey T. Williams / Smithsonian Institution, License: CC BY-SA 3.0 via Fishes of Australia

naker

naker
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[nakɨr] n. terrestrial fern, 1 to 1.5 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3027)

Example: Food: Young leaves are eaten cooked.

nakúr

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n. kind of tree (bark used as rope)

namatamai

namatamai
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Thumbprint emperor, blackspot emperor

Example: Photo by ANFC, License: CC BY-NC 3.0 via Fishes of Australia

napuei

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n. coconut

naskou

naskou
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n. type of flowering plant (collection: Michael J. Balick #5071)

Example: Stem used for stick for Toka dance, due to it’s "hook" shape. . Axe handles and bows are made from this tree, very hard wood.

nefaga

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n. bow and bowstring

nemreken

nemreken
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n. type of fern (collection: Michael J. Balick #5018)

Example: For counting, for example tallying the number of people invited for kava or food, each person can be represented by a pinnae. When done marking each pinnae for a person, take off the rest. Then you’ll be able to return and see the number of pinnae remaining on the rachis if how many people will be coming. Used to make a bird trap. Bleed sap from cut on stem of this tree onto fibers of Pneumatopteris sp. (MB 5018) The fern fibers are rolled into a ball and used to soak up the sap from the tree. Then remove the fern fibers once you have a ball of sap. These fibers are then discarded. The

nesen

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rain

ngarehma

ngarehma
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[nɨŋgare̤me] n. shrub, 4-6 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3090)

Example: This plant is known as "fishbone leaf" as the edge of the leaf tears away and the remaining part is serrated. It is a powerful medicine that is secret.

niagɨn

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n. primary forest

niemes

niemes
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[njiemis] n. tree to 6 m tall, dbh 30 cm (collection: Michael J. Balick #4726)

Example: Green fruits are edible. To eat the leaves, cook them in boiling water for 5-10 minutes, eat with coconut milk. The younger leaves should be the ones harvested for eating. The leaves can also be used to bake a pig in an earth oven, wrap the leaves around the pig. The wood is good for firewood and a person can start the dried wood with no match. The leaves of this plant can be eaten with another, unspecified leaf to stop vomiting. When the fruits are ripe the flying fox and birds like to eat these fruits.

nimakwinari

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n. medicinal leaves, used to feed pigs to make them grow big, or for male erection

nimigi paha

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n. handle of axe

nmeheu

nmeheu
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n. tree growing along ridge track in disturbed forest, next to garden area. (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #2979)

Example: Fuel: Dry portions of this plant are used as firewood.

nurabup

nurabup
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n. very well branched tree, 6-8 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3054)

Example: When this tree grows with straight stems it is used for house posts

nurpiteu

nurpiteu
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n. small tree, 3 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #4231)

Example: 1. Goats and cattle eat the leaves. 2. Wood is used to carve blunt-end arrow heads to hunt pidgeons.

nuvás

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n. Hibiscus, species with edible leaves, ’island cabbage’

nuwak

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n my thigh

nɨfrengɨk

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n my earlobe

nɨmu mɨru

nɨmu mɨru
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wrasse (general name)

Example: Photo by John Turnbull, License: CC BY-SA 3.0 via Fishes of Australia

nɨmé-

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n. inalienable leaves (usually indicates plurality): plants, plantation, trees, etc.

paha

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n. axe

pahái

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n wind direction (NNW)

peyeii pitew

peyeii pitew
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Harry hotlips, blubberlip

Example: Photo by ANFC, License: CC BY-NC 3.0 via Fishes of Australia

pisiwɨr ia rangɨk

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n my fingernail

rewheir

rewheir
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kind of reef fish with green color with black stripes

rewuk

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n my bicuspid (tooth)

swatuk ~ swantuk

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n. pathway, footpath

Takiaew sei tasi

Takiaew sei tasi

Tryon’s Hypselodoris

Example: Photo by tonydiver / iNaturalist, License: CC-BY-NC via inaturalist.org

takiew se tasi

takiew se tasi
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Striped Phyllidopsis

Example: Photo by eschlogl / iNaturalist, License: CC-BY-NC via inaturalist.org

tapuga

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n. kind of kava with small trunk and long roots, a special kava used in custom ceremony

timiun

timiun
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n. tree, 6 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #4246)

Example: 1. The inner bark is used to prepared a medicine to relieve upset stomachs. First, the inner bark is scratched until a handful is produced. Then the bark is squeezed with water until a small glass is filled. The decoction is consumed to relive upset stomachs. 2. The leaves are used to fashion a poultice to heal sores and boils.

tuprena

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earth, soil

tupuk ramamisa

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I feel pain in my belly

(Bislama) bel blo mi so