An example search has returned 100 entries

-a

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v 1. walk, move, be in motion, go, come; 2. combined with the interrogative prefix -ɨf-, implies how, in what manner; 3. with interrogatie prefix and transitive postclitic, implies where

-afɨri

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v paint (especially one’s face during ceremonial events)

-ahiahia

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adj. prickly (as sugarcane or fig leaves)

-apɨni

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v/a level, flat (as ground)

-arakarak

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v/a 1. shake (as a tree); 2. shaky, loose, slack

-avegɨn

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feast

akutamirhi reya

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catch the hen

apa-naputaian

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don’t climb

Bislama

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n. Bislama

eiwhi neii

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pull the plants

hirɨr

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maggot

Iakunwis

Iakunwis
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Iakunwis, home of Nipikinwan tribe

iapwis

iapwis
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squid

kapofe

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head

kapáp

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n testicle

kararɨg

kararɨg
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general term for fungus

kararɨg feimanu

kararɨg feimanu
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n. type of flowering plant (collection: Michael J. Balick #5072)

Example: House posts, rafters, good for building in Tanna. Scrape stem in cup and squeeze with water into a glass to give someone with heavy menstrual bleeding. 1 stem to fill a cup, mix with water, 1 liter /day for 7 days. Shark causes bleeding, maybe the person ate too much shark. This will solve that. This plant is called "medicine of the shark".

kareng reng

kareng reng
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Deep-bodied silver-biddy

Example: Photo by Rick Winterbottom / FishWise Professional, License: CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 via Fishes of Australia

karsapag

karsapag
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n. terrestrial; uncommon. (collection: Tom A. Ranker #2610)

karu ~ kɨru

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num two

kasoso

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[kasoso] small devil

katia

katia
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grater for taro

kawireng

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kind of plantain

Example: Used for cooking and lap-lap

kijirimak sa namritaik

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my elder sister

kisup

kisup

Triton’s Trumpet

Example: Photo by tonydiver / iNaturalist, License: CC-BY-NC via inaturalist.org

koaba

koaba
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[koa̤pe] n. tree in house area near village, 5 m tall (collection: Michael J. Balick #4720)

Example: The fruit of this tree is edible. The stem yields posts for building houses. The wood from the tree is said to be very strong, so larger parts of the tree can be used for house construction. The leaves are used to treat diarrhea. A person chews 4 leaves at a time as long as needed.

konianaker

konianaker
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Blacktip grouper (deep sea)

Example: Photo by Richard Ling, License: CC BY-SA 3.0 via Fishes of Australia

koniere

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n. tree, h= 15 m. young brown elongate fruits with a greyish green fleshy calyx. Thick branchlets with the leaves at the top. White latex. For the locals it is the main kind of burckella obovata (round fruits). (collection: Laurence Ramon #332)

konuwak

konuwak
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Whitespotted grouper

Example: Photo by ANFC, License: CC BY-SA 3.0 via Fishes of Australia

konweker

konweker
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n. tree, up to 15 m tall

Example: Photo by Martial Wahe

krefi

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kind of breadfruit, produces a long breadfruit that tastes very good

Example: The stem of the tree is good for making a canoe

kurgen

kurgen
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Greasy grouper (reef fish)

Example: Photo by Jeffrey T. Williams / Smithsonian Institution, License: CC BY-SA 3.0 via Fishes of Australia

kusan itoga

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n green snail

kwanapit

kwanapit
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n. herb to 50 cm, flowers pink (collection: Michael J. Balick #4721)

Example: This plant is used to treat diarrhea. A person takes 1 handful of leaves, washes the soil off, chews them and gets the juice out of the leaves, spits out the fibers and left over parts of the leaves. Chew this regularly until the diarrhea goes away if a person has a bad case; for a mild case, chew only once. It is said that a person has to "listen to the plant" until the diarrhea stops. It is said to be better for this condition than Psidium (guava).

kwanfara

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n. pandanus fruit

kwaninihi

kwaninihi
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[kwani̤ni̤] n. herb to 1 m, flowers yellow (collection: Michael J. Balick #4730)

Example: The entire plant is pulled up, the stems bound together and used to make a local broom.

kɨmiahaga

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n. a secondary sprout or shoot (of a plant)

makhum

makhum
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Blue-barred parrotfish

Example: Photo by J. E. Randall, License: CC BY-NC 3.0 via Fishes of Australia

makhum

makhum
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Quoy’s parrotfish

Example: Photo by zsispeo, License: CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 via Flickr

murieki

murieki
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kind of skink

nakwsakweien

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death

napuei sanmwun

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n. his or her coconut

napɨr

napɨr
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n. type of fern (collection: Michael J. Balick #5127)

Example: Medicinal use. For back pain, take double handful of leaf, mash it in 1/2 liter of water, squeeze into cup. Drink 2 cups / day, morning and afternoon for 5 days.

nare

nare
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n. herb to 1.5 m tall, flowers white (collection: Michael J. Balick #4722)

Example: This plant is used to welcome people by weaving the leaves and flowers into a head lei, locally known as a Kuanari. If there are no flowers, people weave the leaves and use these to welcome visitors. This species is becoming an invasive in the area.

narparerep

narparerep
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n. terrestrial herb, 0.5 to 1 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3028)

Example: Ecological: This plant, which grows near streams, is known to hold water during the dry season. If the plant is harvested, then it is known that the stream will not continue to run. Thus, precaution is taken to keep this plant in good health.

nasasa

nasasa
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n. banyan growing next to house along main path. (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3150)

Example: The bark of this tree is used to make a kastom strap, particularly worn in the Toka Dance, where people have different ranks, and the kastom belt of this bark shows a person’s rank.

nasitov

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n. Indian coral tree

Naskao

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village betwen yatukwei and tapir

nasár

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n. kind of fern

nauaua

nauaua
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n. large, well branched tree (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #4226)

Example: 1. Flying foxes are attracted to the flowers. 2. The bole is used to make end posts of western style houses known as nimah itoga. 3. Wood is used to make axe handles.

navan

navan
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n. type of flowering plant (collection: Michael J. Balick #5144)

Example: Sawn timber. Very hard wood. Fruit bats enjoy eating from this tree. Hunters know this and will go there to hunt.

nawawa

nawawa
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[nəwowa] n. well branched tree, 10 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #2983)

Example: Agricultural: When in flower, taro (Nerei) is said to be ready for harvest.

nawes

nawes
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n. type of flowering plant (collection: Michael J. Balick #5091)

Example: When the fruit is ripe, it is put in a pot with water. Fill half of a large bag (2 liters) with fruit, add this to 2 liters of water and macerate the fruit in the water. Drink 2 cups/day of this extract, morning and afternoon, for one week to make skin oily when it is too dry. This is necessary, for example, when a person drinks too much kava and thir skin dries out. Eat young fruits as a protection from someone who wants to do you harm. It is said that the fruit has 10 eyes, and can watch after you. Cover fish with leaves to cook in a fire. Crush and boil pieces of the stem and leaves and

nefeng

nefeng
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n. type of flowering plant (collection: Michael J. Balick #5067)

Example: Stem to make house posts. Put fruits in with sweet potato when planting to enable the sweet potato to yield a good crop.

nei peken

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n. medicinal leaves applied to circumcision wounds

nepikesy

nepikesy
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n. type of flowering plant (collection: Michael J. Balick #5035)

Example: Root is sold to earn money, as perfume and oil is from this. Grandparents used to dry the wood over a cooking fire in a kitchen when a person would get the flu. To help, they’d take dried and heated wood, scrape one cup’s worth into hot water, and then breathe over the steam bath. Drink water afterwards. Do thhis once a day for three days.

nhawi

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kind of yam, produces tubers with white flesh that are very sweet. It is easy to grow and very productive with large bundles of tubers

Example: Said to be good for roasting or frying in oil. This hard, sweet yam is said to be the best tasting of all

nifua

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n. kind of parasitic plant

niras

niras
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n. type of flowering plant (collection: Michael J. Balick #5087)

Example: Very poison sap and leaves. When in fruit the fruit bat eat this and can’t fly well so fall down and can be harvested.

nisai-apran

nisai-apran
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n. tree to 3 m, dbh 4 cm (collection: Michael J. Balick #4727)

Example: The leaves of this plant are used to make a women’s grass skirt. Men use these leaves to put in a band around the arm as decoration. For kastom ceremony, take coconut endosperm, chew with this leave and covery body. It makes the body smell very nice. When a person has a fever, mix this leaf with other leaves including Annona muricata and Citrus species. Then the person sits over a steaming pot and inhales it to reduce the fever and symptoms. If you need to go to a "tabu" place, where the spirit can make you sick, a person can bathe with the leaves of this plant and can go anywh

nitei nitei

nitei nitei
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n. terrestrial; leaves up to ca. 2-2.5 m long. (collection: Tom A. Ranker #2616)

nkhaourakou

nkhaourakou
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n. type of flowering plant (collection: Michael J. Balick #5083)

Example: Wood is hard, making it good for canoe making. Also used to make the stick that holds outrigger to canoe (Nikiavet).

nkwai nanimem

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n the white of my eye

nurap

nurap
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n. shrub, 2 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3039)

Example: Fuel: Dried wood of this plant is used as firewood. Not: This plant is considered the mountain form. There is another form, Nowaripen, found near the sea.

nuvás

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n. Hibiscus, species with edible leaves, ’island cabbage’

nóropɨg

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n. kind of tree, leaves used to set chewed kava on, bark infusions for treatment of coughs

nɨfweiag

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n. kind of tree

(Bislama) navenu

nɨkafereng

nɨkafereng
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[nɨkafereŋ] n. kind of shrub, 2 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #2975)

Example: Animal Feed: The whole plant is fed to pigs to keep them fat and healthy. It is referred to as “pig medecine” and is given once per week.

nɨkava mɨsinsinier

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n. kind of kava with variegated leaves

nɨkava pitov

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n. black kava (stems are black color)

nɨmatagi asori

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cyclone

nɨsɨme

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who? (singular)

nɨtuán ~ natuán

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n. kind of tree with scented bark, can be used for timber

pawpawuk

pawpawuk
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Tailed Rustic

Example: Photo by obinfiji / iNaturalist, License: CC-BY-NC via inaturalist.org

pirawa ~ firawa

pirawa ~ firawa
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Thumbprint emperor, blackspot emperor

Example: Photo by ANFC, License: CC BY-NC 3.0 via Fishes of Australia

ramaha

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n low tide

ramerouk ia karwatereii

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throw the stone

(Bislama) sakem stone

rawtapareɨ ia- takouar

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v. intransitive walk uphill

rawɨs

rawɨs
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n. woman’s or men’s grass skirt (women’s are longer, men’s shorter)

rewuk

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n my bicuspid (tooth)

riminhik

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my dad

rinak

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my mum, my mother

sasave

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n. kind of sugarcane

Suatouk kehep

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n trail joining two villages

Takiaew sei tasi

Takiaew sei tasi
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Kuni’s Nudibranch

Example: Photo by eschlogl / iNaturalist, License: CC-BY-NC via inaturalist.org

Takiaew sei tasi

Takiaew sei tasi
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Loch’s Chromodoris

Example: Photo by tonydiver / iNaturalist, License: CC-BY-NC via inaturalist.org

takurei nusuk

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n my ankle

Tapir

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tihi-

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flower

tikinau

tikinau
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n. bamboo, smallest type used for weaving house walls

toti

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belt made of tapa, traditionally used to hold up men’s penis wrappers

trotɨria

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snapper fish

tɨmri

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n. cutting of leaves or top portion of taro or sugarcane stalk set aside for replanting

tɨpatɨpa

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n a type of lobster: Caledonian mitten lobster, a.k.a. slipper lobster (Parribacus caledonicus)

wipin akwes

wipin akwes
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Yellowtail scad

Example: Photo by ANFC, License: CC BY-NC 3.0 via Fishes of Australia

yakamapri

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I sleep

yaknamapri

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I will sleep soon

(Bislama) mi stap silip nao.

yanarao

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yesu

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goatfish, small and red

yesu

yesu
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Whitesaddle goatfish

Example: Photo by Patrick Randall, License: CC BY-SA 3.0 via Fishes of Australia