An example search has returned 100 entries

alapdaig

listenloadingplaying

v. to collect raw food, as sugarcane taro, for a feast of uncooked food

apan

listenloadingplaying

v.n. to go

apos yi aktit

listenloadingplaying

v.n. to steer straight

arahed

listenloadingplaying

[araheθ] n. round

ariñ

listenloadingplaying

adj. sharp

ariñ

listenloadingplaying

v. warm on the fire (like tobacco leaves); heat

asvii

listenloadingplaying

v. break soft things (like bread, cassava, taro, etc.); cut in half

asvii intal

listenloadingplaying

[asvintal] phr. break taro

ateucradi se an namilvai

v.n. get off the reef

ato

listenloadingplaying

adj. straight

eceliek

adj. a second growth as of taro

Ek idivaig nenis ainyak

phr. I am quite useless

eseij

listenloadingplaying

[eseʧ] num. three

fawarefi

listenloadingplaying

n. kind of bird

inca

listenloadingplaying

n. kind of crab

inceideuc

n. the white wood of a tree

incelas

listenloadingplaying

n. kind of crab

incet tal

n. a basket of taro

incope

listenloadingplaying

n. kind of fish

indal elwa

listenloadingplaying

n. multicolored taro, fancy-leaved caladium (RPV #146)

inhaceriapeke

listenloadingplaying

n. kind of shellfish

inhaw

listenloadingplaying

n. Macaranga tanarius (RPV #42)

injupurapam

listenloadingplaying

[inʤupuram] n. nearly dark

inmadidi

inmadidi
listenloadingplaying

n. tree to 7 m, dbh 30 com (collection: Michael J. Balick #4870)

Example: This plant is used for spiritual purposes. When fruits are young, the children take the fruit, cut it open and take coconut leaf midribs, impaling the seeds on the midribs and painting themselves with the fruit.

inmopon

listenloadingplaying

[inmopon] n. liver

inmorantejed

inmorantejed
listenloadingplaying

n. Coral hind, coral grouper (deep sea)

Example: Photo by Jan Messersmith, License: CC BY-SA 3.0 via Fishes of Australia

inmowanijvañ

inmowanijvañ
listenloadingplaying

n. tree, 4 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3270)

intal athunwai

n. kind of taro

inteijid

n. species of pine

intekes ~ inrowod

intekes ~ inrowod
listenloadingplaying

n. treelet, 2 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #4085)

Example: 1. The green leaves of this plant are used to cover fish, when cooking them in a fire.

intesianekro

listenloadingplaying

n. kind of fish

intiklan cai

n. tops of branches

intoutau

intoutau

n. shrub, 2 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3486)

inucai

listenloadingplaying

n. kind of bush

inwae

inwae
listenloadingplaying

n. tree, 3-4 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3563)

Example: Children like to eat the fruit of this plant. It is said to taste like pineapple/mango. It must be very ripe to be eaten. Peel and discard the skin. The fruit is most sweet when it is on the ground for a few days. Some children eat the seeds of this fruit but it has a strong oily taste--too many cause vomiting and if a person eats 1-2 seeds it can cause diarrhea.

inwerinwei

listenloadingplaying

[inwerinɣweɪ] n. board (sg)

isvii

listenloadingplaying

v. read; count

iñcesjinyat

listenloadingplaying

n. sandalwood (RPV #110)

kaihec

listenloadingplaying

[kajheɣ] phr. Good bye.

lakasia

lakasia
listenloadingplaying

n. kind of flowering plant (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #4767)

meto

adj. ripe; also "metto"

naha

n. a thistle

nahed u paralelcei

nahed u paralelcei
listenloadingplaying

n. epiphyte on main trunk of large mango tree, growing in secondary forest above river. (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3657)

nahojcei

nahojcei
listenloadingplaying

n. low-growing, creeping vine growing in grassy area just inland from coastal strand. Flowers purple. (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3224)

Example: Long time ago used seeds to make necklaces, don’t last long.

naipumnyu

n. kind of plant, grass, or fern

naisiom

listenloadingplaying

[najsiom] n. bird nest

nake

nake
listenloadingplaying

n. terrestrial fern, 1 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3712)

Example: The very young leaves of this plant are edible.

naklakla adimi

listenloadingplaying

n. dwarf (North dialect)

nakweiwei

nakweiwei
listenloadingplaying

n. treelet to 1 m, sterile. In transition zone from pine forest to scrub forest. (collection: Michael J. Balick #4981)

Example: The wood is used to make a fishing spear. Cut the straight stems, heat it in fire, straighten it as much as needed, cool the stem, peel the bark off of the stem and let it cure for 1 month. In the past, the end of the spear was carved into a sharp point and used for fishing. Now steel rods are placed on the tip to catch the fish. This is used in shallow water (fresh water or sea water) as the wood is heavy and can sink. People making these spears go to older forests that are higher up to collect the wood.

nalak

listenloadingplaying

n. kind of fish

nam̃aka

listenloadingplaying

n. kind of bush

nanad

nanad
listenloadingplaying

n. shrub. Growing near the beach. (collection: Ashley A McGuigan #4)

Example: 1. Dried branches from this plant can be used to roast vegetable crops that women eat if they have problems becoming pregnant. 2. Firewood, burns well. 3. Some people will eat the green fruit for protection against black magic. Eat 5 fruits for this. Eat it only once – will last for a year.

naoun nedoun

listenloadingplaying

[nawʊn nɛθoʊn] n. leg

napaecei

napaecei
listenloadingplaying

n. epiphyte on fallen tree branch with abundant mosses, growing in rain forest on the mountain slope. (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3291)

napuig

n. a reed frame for supporting the tendrils of yams

napuleman

n. kind of banana

narectejed

listenloadingplaying

n. kind of crab

nareram

n. kind of banana

nariko

n. bean

narilau

listenloadingplaying

n. kind of crab

nariyas

listenloadingplaying

n. kind of shellfish

narutu matoga

narutu matoga

n. the north-east wind

nasieij

n. native cabbage

nasjiñaho

nasjiñaho
listenloadingplaying

n. shrub to 1 m, flowers greenish-white. (collection: Michael J. Balick #4932)

Example: The roots are used to treat toothache. Take the roots, strip off the outer bark and chew the root. Stops pain from the toothache. Use 3x daily until the pain is gone.

nasuol

listenloadingplaying

n. kind of shellfish

nau

n. bamboo; a mountain

nauaneig

n. a reed

nauwau

n. a bulrush; a flag

nauyerop̃

nauyerop̃
listenloadingplaying

n. tree, 2 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3487)

Example: 1. To cure spirit sickness of the niteitau. Use plants that also end with "au" : niditau, intoutau, naoyerop. Go to the top of the plant to get the soft leaves of the plants niditau, intoutau, naoyerop, also take the bark. The person making the medicine should be holding the these leaves with a piece of nelmaha. Nelmaha means go away. The sick person chews the leaves and bark and swallows the juice spitting out the fiber into the nelmaha the medicine maker is holding. The medicine person then takes the spit out fiber in the nalmaha leaf and throws it into the sea in front of the village. 2. Edible fruits, when ripe or green, does not taste when green, but sweet when ripe. 3a. Leaves (young) are edible, for example wrap around coconut meat and eat or cook with island cabbage and other leaves, boil and add coconut milk and eat. 3b. The young leaves are edible, after boiling for 5 minutes. A piece of coconut and a pinch of salt is wrapped in the leaves and eaten. The mature leaves are used to wrap food such as pig or cow meat and cooked in an earth oven. Tie this bundle with a piece of Pandanus fiber to secure it before putting in the earth oven. 4. During big feast, use this a lot – circumcison or wedding feast, harvest leaves and wrap around meat and bake on earth oven – sometimes we cut down a whole tree to gather leaves. 5. To make men’s custom belt – split stem, peel outer bark off to take inner bark and peel it, tear end to make strap that can be tied. Dry in sun but not direct sunlight. 6. Older large trunks were burned by ancestors to keep fire going – did not need matches (lefre(?) matches) because embers would stay for days and when make a fire add smaller branches to make a flame.

nawalha itouga

nawalha itouga
listenloadingplaying

n. sedge, 0. 5 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3610)

neaig

n. the kernel of a coconut; the coconut tree

neaig auyag

n. kind of palm

necye

listenloadingplaying

n. yellow star

necñopod cap

necñopod cap
listenloadingplaying

n. shrub to 2. 5 m tall, 1 cm dbh (collection: Michael J. Balick #4856)

Example: When a person gets burned by a fire, take the leaves, squeeze sap on the burn, and then rub a handful of leaves on the burn; use a larger amount of leaves if the person has a larger burn. Apply it directly after the person is burned. This treatment will stop the burn from blistering. Use once. When a 1 month to 2 year old baby has redness or sores on their tongue and cannot eat properly, and saliva is coming out from their mouth, take the sap of the crushed leaves in a spoon and give it to the baby. Take one teaspoon for a 1-5 month old child and a tablespoon for a 6-24 month old. Give the baby once a day for 2 days. This treatment cleanses out the reddish sores. If a person has a sore that is persistent and stays red and sore for a week or more, take 4 apices of this plant, chew and spit on the sore to help it heal. Use 1x in the morning, and next day in the afternoon. Use 2x only. If a person is walking in the bush and concerned about evil spirits, put a small branch behind the ear to be safe. To treat hot chest pain, dizziness, shortage of breath, and if a person has a hot pain that does not go away after taking panadol (aspirin), take 8 leaves and squeeze into a glass of water until it turns reddish, drink 1x a day for 3 days; this is said to make the pain go away.

nedouyatmas

nedouyatmas
listenloadingplaying

n. sparsely branched understory tree, 4-5 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #4030)

Example: 1. It is considered "tabu" to cover laplap with the leaf of this species. It is said to spoil the laplap.

nehno

n. a species of poisonous tree

nehtumta

n. land newly planted with taro

nejev

nejev
listenloadingplaying

n. Skipjack tuna

Example: Photo by Krw130lm / Fishes of Australia, License: CC BY-A-SA 3.0 via Fishes of Australia

nelmaha

nelmaha
listenloadingplaying

n. tree. Growing near village. (collection: Ashley A McGuigan #6)

Example: 1. To cure spirit sickness of the niteitau. Use plants that also end with "au" : niditau, intoutau, naoyerop. Go to the top of the plant to get the soft leaves of the plants niditau, intoutau, naoyerop, also take the bark. The person making the medicine should be holding the these leaves with a piece of nelmaha. Nelmaha means go away. The sick person chews the leaves and bark and swallows the juice spitting out the fiber into the nelmaha the medicine maker is holding. The medicine person then takes the spit out fiber in the nalmaha leaf and throws it into the sea in front of the village. 2. To cure headaches casued by bad spirit - Take one top from Nelmaha and one from inrowod (white stripe variety) Combine and chew these then spit them out and apply to the sick persons forehead. 3. To cure headaches - Someone other than the woman must prepare this. Break the top branch of netethae and remove leaves for use. Combine with the top leaves of the top branch of nelmaha. Chew the leaves and drink the juice. Do this when the sun is setting on the horizon. The woman gives the leftover fibers to the person who prepared the medicine and that person goes and throws the fibers in the direction of the setting sun. 4. To cure toothache when pregnant - Take the inner bark from Intejed and boil it in a pot of seawater (about 1 liter) along with 2 leaves from each of inpounatmas, narayag, nahayag, and nelmaha. Boil until juice is visibly leaving the plants. Put this water into your mouth and hold it there for 2-3 minutes. Do this this with one cup in the morning, 1 cup in the afternoon, and 1 cup in the evening. 5. Used to fight against black magic in an unspecified way. 6. Roll leaf and put in pocket for protection when walk in a new area. 7. Message plant if a land dispute – if a person puts this stem or leaf in another’s garden whom they are angry with it means go away!! 8. To treat sick people, especially who fall ill from black magic to save their life. Symptoms vary, for example a person with small boils over body,* a person chews the leaf and spits it on the sick person, 1x and then puts the branch with leaves near the sick person when they sleep – 3x (1x day) branch is ca. 25cm long. (*headache, severe)

nemijcopau

n. kind of palm

neroa

neroa
listenloadingplaying

n. tree to 5 m, dbh 12 cm (collection: Michael J. Balick #4917)

Example: Flowers are used to decorate the house and other areas as they are very fragrant. The leaves are used to cover taro cooked in an earth oven.

niau

listenloadingplaying

[nijaʊ] n. March (lit. a kind of plant like bamboo but smaller)

nida

nida
listenloadingplaying

n. shrub to 2 m ,fruits green (collection: Michael J. Balick #4884)

Example: When the new leaves form on this plant, people say that it is time to plant taro. The wood of the larger tree is good for posts.

nida

nida
listenloadingplaying

n. tree, 1. 5 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3685)

Example: Sharpen the end of a straight pole of this tree and use it to plant taro in a swampy area. For family planning. Scratch away the inner bark into your hand and mix with 1/4 cup salty water. Woman the uses (not specified how to use) it after her monthly period to protect her from getting pregnant.

niditau

niditau
listenloadingplaying

n. tree, 3 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3507)

Example: The young leaves and fruits are edible; the fruits are eaten ripe. This species is used for firewood as well as house posts, but they don’t last as long as other types of wood so they are used in temporary structures. A sacred plant on Aneityum. Name means linkage between this world and the spirit world. Agriculture – you find this tree ?? it means that the land is fertile. Birds eat fruits; people burn the tree to release ash and fertilizer and grow their taro around it – it will give more food. Message plant – if someone puts a long brown on your door or in your garden, it means “why are you here?” Implies that you should go back to where you belong. You don’t belong in this place. For example instead of quarreling over land dispute, put the branch and it means that you should leave this place.

nijcel

nijcel
listenloadingplaying

n. tree, 8-9 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3655)

Example: If the preferred banana leaves are not available to wrap food for cooking, then use young leaves of this species and tie taro and fish for cooking. Take 4-5 leaves and wrap the food with the leaves. Tie a rope around the food and tie them all together using any strong vine. They can then be cooked over an open fire.

nijkowai

nijkowai
listenloadingplaying

n. Spanish flag, stripey

Example: Photo by Ian Shaw / iNaturalist.org, License: CC BY-NC 3.0 via Fishes of Australia

nilam

n. seaweed

nimhag

n. branch (large)

nimtinjap par alau

n. wind-related term; no definition provided

nirid

listenloadingplaying

[niriθ] n. gills

nomotmot tucjup

n. kind of plant, grass, or fern

nononhat

nononhat
listenloadingplaying

n. Blue-lined large-eye bream

Example: Photo by Jean-Lou Justine / Wikimedia Commons, License: CC BY-SA 3.0 via Fishes of Australia

nopropra (~ noporopora ?)

nopropra (~ noporopora ?)
listenloadingplaying

n. basket used to carry sweet potatoes

Example: Photo by K. David Harrison, April 2016.

nowihit

listenloadingplaying

n. kind of fish (folk name)

nunyepec

nunyepec

n. understory tree, 6 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #4049)

Example: 1. The name means "knife of sandpaper", a type of fish. The leaf base resembles the fin of the fish. 2. In the past, a spear was made from the sapling wood of this plant for tribal warfare. Today, spears are made from this plant for fishing. First, a relatively straight spaling is chosen and then heated over a fire. The pliable portion of wood is straightened and then decorticated. When cool, a portion of wire can be affixed on one end to aid in the spearing of fish.

nusjakai

listenloadingplaying

n. kind of fish (folk name)

ritastas ara

listenloadingplaying

[ritastas ara] phr. they are talking

tarucai

n. kind of taro

ucsiligei

v.a. to pare off rind