An example search has returned 50 entries

ajujai

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v.n. to go up, or go east

ariñ

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v. warm on the fire (like tobacco leaves); heat

asjec

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v. lay down

ehmehma

adj. healed, applied to wounds; ripe; yellow

erijai

v.n. to rise up; to overflow as sea on land; to get ashore

ham

v.n. to come

incai er hegaig

n. a tree for food; a fruit tree

incetcanalaiñ

incetcanalaiñ
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n. kind of flowering plant (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #4759)

inhen owuh

inhen owuh
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n. taro patch

Example: Photo by K. David Harrison, Dec. 2018, Aneityum island.

inlepei u inpoded atamaiñ

inlepei u inpoded atamaiñ
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n. epiphyte on main trunk (near base) of large tree, growing in dense rainforest. (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #4060)

inmapoded

n. kind of breadfruit

inmauwad ahi

n. a convolvulus with white flowers; also "inmauwad picad"

inmehei

inmehei
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n. kind of cabbage or leaf

Example: Photo by K. David Harrison, April 2016.

inmeri

n. a stringy bark tree

inmokomma

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n. kind of fish

inpakanhas

inpakanhas
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n. fallen tree, growing in coastal vegetation along strand. Flowers orange. (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3554)

Example: The stems are used for house posts as they are very strong.

inyag

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n. yellow (color)

karu uwaruwa

n. wind-related term; no definition provided

ma

adj. ripe, as fruit; healed, as a wound; also "mah"

nafaiava

n. bay (of the sea); creek

nagdenayi

n. kind of taro

nahau

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n. turtle

nahojcei

nahojcei

n. scrambling vine, growing in coastal strand vegetation. Flowers purple. (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3436)

nai

n. a plant with red leaves

nakrai

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n. kind of bush

nalefm̃ut

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n. kind of bird

nalmuh

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n. kind of shellfish

namaunirij

namaunirij
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n. herb to 30 cm, fruits green. (collection: Michael J. Balick #4934)

Example: Take the leaves, squeeze out the juice in a cup of water, drink 3x daily for 3 days to treat dengue fever--use one handful of leaves in a cup of water and drink cool. The fruits are edible. Peel the outer part off and eat like a tomato.

namu atam̃eñ

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n. kind of shellfish (m)

nanad

nanad
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[nanaθ] n. shrub, 2-3 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3455)

Example: Fertilizer, take fresh leaves and put in area where plant taro.

narayag

narayag
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n. tree. Growing in village garden. (collection: Ashley A McGuigan #20)

Example: 1. To cure toothache when pregnant - Take the inner bark from Intejed and boil it in a pot of seawater (about 1 liter) along with 2 leaves from each of inpounatmas, narayag, nahayag, and nelmaha. Boil until juice is visibly leaving the plants. Put this water into your mouth and hold it there for 2-3 minutes. Do this this with one cup in the morning, 1 cup in the afternoon, and 1 cup in the evening. 2. Plant used to check with fish has ciguatera, in same way as other collection – GMP #4768. Stick white – OK to eat. Stick black or brown – not good.

neaig milmat

n. a green coconut

necec u prikad

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n. kind of crab

necemas

necemas
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n. terrestrial plant, growing in dry forest. (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3509)

Example: This is a "message plant" that signifies that there has been a death. The person holds it or puts it on their head, goes to another person’s house and hands it to the person they wish to convey the message to, without saying anything and that person knows that someone has died. It can also be handed to that person. The person receiving the message then asks "who" and is told the deceased person’s name.

nedec

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n. kind of shellfish

neka

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n. Group of fish including triggerfish, wrasses, chubs, mullets, jacks, and sweetlips

nekitau

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n. kind of bush

nekrei

nekrei
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n. Sailfin tang

Example: Photo by Mark Rosenstein / iNaturalist.org, License: CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 via Fishes of Australia

nese

n. the takoma or tekma, a tree with white flowers

nese

nese
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n. type of fruit

Example: Photo by K. David Harrison, April 2016.

nete

n. kind of tree

nhujac

nhujac
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n. epiphyte on branch of Syzygium tree, growing in secondary forest along trail above river. dry fruits. (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3661)

nieg

n. a reed

nijinga

nijinga
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n. shrub to 2 m, flowers blue-purple. Red clay soil (collection: Michael J. Balick #4878)

Example: A stem of this shrub is sharpened and used to dig a hole for planting kava. When a person plants kava in a hole made from this stick, there is the belief that it will make kava root stems strong and large. The fruits are edible when ripe and said to be sweet.

niridlo

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n. kind of shellfish

niyeg

niyeg
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n. grass. Found in disturbed area behind the village. (collection: Ashley A McGuigan #12)

Example: 1. To cure the sea snake (nispev) curse that causes missed periods. First the husband must combine 4 young leaves of incispev and 4 young leaves of nafanu and mash and squeeze the juice into a small bamboo (1-1.5 inch diameter) The nafanu is important because it is a plant that connects to the sea. Use wildcane leaves cover the bamboo closed. Go to the sick person and unwrap the snake from her. Start from the top and let the woman drink a small part of the potion then wash her with the mixture, making sure to wash head, elbows, knees, feet, and belly. Then take a leaf of naha and break it over the woman’s belly button to break the snake off. Smash the bamboo vessel to pieces. Leave the woman there until the wash dries on her. This takes one whole day and the ceremony in the evening so she can sleep and she must not eat. This ritual is performed by men. 2. Main plant to thatch roof of local houses. 3. Collect the dry stems, tie together, use as a torch at night for walking or walking along the reef when fishing. 4. Take 1 cane and tie the leaves together and tie on a tree to indicate tabu – e.g. a citrus tree that will be ripe soon to tell people not to pick it. 5. To catch crabs just before sunset, burn the torch and shake the ashes on the rocks; come back an hour or so later and the crabs are attracted by the ashes and you can collect them. 6. Can also use to weave walls of house. 7. Women clean the leaves of the stem and use the hard part of the stem to strip pandanus leaf before weaving a basket. 8. Cut wild cane in half and sharpen the end, use this to cut the dried pandanus leaves into small strips. 9. Tie leaves into a knot and stick the knot on the kava stem; t is means that this kava goes “express” so the carrier goes to one border of a village and passes it to another person who knows it cannot stop in this village but goes to the next border and is passed on 10. This plant is a “message plant” to say “don’t stop,” referring to something being delivered.

nohwai itai

n. berry

numra napo

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[numra napo] n. the Southern Cross

numurumu

numurumu
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n. epiphyte on tree trunk, growing in rain forest on the mountain slope. (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3290)

oho

v.n. to bear fruit as a tree