An example search has returned 50 entries

ama

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[ama] num. four

fawarefi

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n. kind of bird

incai upunupun

n. bramble

incat

n. flax

incowos yag

n. plant used to make ceremonial head wreath and neck garland

indao

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n. twig, branch

inhaceriapeke

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n. kind of shellfish

inhuya

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n. kind of shellfish

inlolan niʧinandan

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[inlolan niʧinandan] n. forehead

inmehtit

n. breadfruit crop in October

inpwain ~ inhwain

inpwain ~ inhwain
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[inpwain ~ inhwain] n. Pacific Reef Egret

Example: Photo by Arthur Chapman, License: CC BY-NC 2.0 via Flickr

intesyan numarei

intesyan numarei
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n. Longspine emperor

Example: Photo by Museum of New Zealand / Te Papa Tongarewa, License: CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 via Fishes of Australia

intesyanam̃a

intesyanam̃a
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n. terrestrial plant and epiphyte at base of trees, growing in cloud forest in valley between inrerow and adjacent summit. Inflorescences pale yellow. (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3278)

inteucjip

n. bush land where forest trees grow; also "intucjip"

inya

inya
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n. large tree, 16 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3222)

Example: 1. As a child’s game, some times children put the segments of the needles together to see who can make the largest one. 2. A "calendar plant"--when the needles are brown, it is an indication that people should not work hard, but should rest or they will not feel well. If they try to work they will feel sleepy--an indication of the season of higher heat. 3. Wood is used as firewood. 4. Firewood, inner bark good for ciguatera poisoning, scratch the inner bark and squeeze juice into a cup of water and give to the sick person to drink – very effective. Use the largest most mature part of the stem.

irai ohatag

n. celestial

nadimi dama

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[nadimi dama] phr. four men (there are)

nafanu

nafanu
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n. tree. Growing on the coast. (collection: Ashley A McGuigan #23)

Example: 1. To cure the sea snake (nispev) curse that causes missed periods. First the husband must combine 4 young leaves of incispev and 4 young leaves of nafanu and mash and squeeze the juice into a small bamboo (1-1.5 inch diameter) The nafanu is important because it is a plant that connects to the sea. Use wildcane leaves cover the bamboo closed. Go to the sick person and unwrap the snake from her. Start from the top and let the woman drink a small part of the potion then wash her with the mixture, making sure to wash head, elbows, knees, feet, and belly. Then take a leaf of naha and break it over the woman’s belly button to break the snake off. Smash the bamboo vessel to pieces. Leave the woman there until the wash dries on her. This takes one whole day and the ceremony in the evening so she can sleep and she must not eat. This ritual is performed by men. 2. Firewood, house post for bush house.

nahoacen

nahoacen
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n. vine to 3-4 m, aerial tubers brown (collection: Michael J. Balick #4872)

Example: Normally these fruits are considered poisonous. But, people have learned to peel off the skin of the fruits, put the peeled fruits in a conical basked and place a bamboo tube that is dripping water over it to wash the basket of fruits for 3-5 days. This is said to leach out the poison and the end result is similar in consistency to cheese. Wrap this up with leaves and put it in an earth oven to cook. This plant is eaten as a "starvation food" only, consumed in times of drought and famine.

nahraren nepig

n. dawn of day

najeng

najeng
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n. tree, 8-10 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #4017)

Example: 1. Aerial roots have a natural curve that allows them to be used as a clothing hanger. The outer bark is peeled and dried all day in the sun, before the roots are used. 2. Leaves are used to help remove fish bones lodged in one’s throat. When bones are stuck in one’s throat, then you apply young leaves to the outside of the throat. Apply once and leave until the bones are removed.

najgau

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n. kind of fish

nam̃ut

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n. kind of bush

nanec

nanec
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n. kind of flowering plant (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #4756)

naoun nijman

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[nawʊn niʧman] n. arm

napuke

n. a mound or hillock for yams

nap̃ojev

nap̃ojev
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n. well branched, partly fallen tree (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #4054)

Example: 1. Branches of these leaves are used to cover and insulate earth ovens.

nauanohatag

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n. firmament (astronomical)

naule

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v. to fish (with a net)

necñopod

necñopod
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n. shrub, 1 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3512)

Example: This plant is used as fertilzer to place on bottom of the taro patch in the same way as GMP #3456 to help "feed the ground" for next year. The leaves are used to wrap food. When a person is chewing kava, pile the chewed kava roots on the young leaves of this species. Also, an unspecified medicinal use.

nedouyatmas

nedouyatmas
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n. small, sparsely branched tree (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3463)

Example: This is considered a sacred plant. People do not use this plant as it is considered "of the devil."

negrecreipek

negrecreipek
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n. herb, growing in partially drained marsh and along weedy areas of road. (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3600)

Example: This plant is used as an ornament in the hair.

neijis ieg

n. a bundle of reeds for a torch; a torch

nejeg tau

nejeg tau
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n. tree, 3 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3518)

Example: People plant this tree near the coast, specifically as small fish and shellfish hide in it to breed and people know this.

nekrolas

nekrolas
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n. tree, 4 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #4126)

Example: 1. The wood of this tree can be used as posts and rafters in traditional houses.

nelyat

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n. nellet tree (RPV #116)

nemtanla

nemtanla
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n. herb to 1 m, flowers yellow. (collection: Michael J. Balick #4892)

Example: If a person is coming to a "new" village, e.g. not their own, and they have a branch in their hand, it means that they are coming in peace and not trying to harm anyone else in the new village. Or if they are asking for something that might be found in the new village, they hold the branch of this species and pass it to a person from that village so they will accept you.

nidel

n. a meteor; also "nidil"

nijhinga

nijhinga
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n. shrub, 1-1. 25 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3591)

Example: The fruits of this species are edible when ripe (black) and are very sweet. It grows in the white grass area in the open. It is "numba one" fruit. If a person eats a lot of these it turns their tongue reddish-purple.

nillum

n. a species of seaweed

niseuc

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[niseuɣ] n. walking stick, staff

niyeg

niyeg
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n. grass. Found in disturbed area behind the village. (collection: Ashley A McGuigan #12)

Example: 1. To cure the sea snake (nispev) curse that causes missed periods. First the husband must combine 4 young leaves of incispev and 4 young leaves of nafanu and mash and squeeze the juice into a small bamboo (1-1.5 inch diameter) The nafanu is important because it is a plant that connects to the sea. Use wildcane leaves cover the bamboo closed. Go to the sick person and unwrap the snake from her. Start from the top and let the woman drink a small part of the potion then wash her with the mixture, making sure to wash head, elbows, knees, feet, and belly. Then take a leaf of naha and break it over the woman’s belly button to break the snake off. Smash the bamboo vessel to pieces. Leave the woman there until the wash dries on her. This takes one whole day and the ceremony in the evening so she can sleep and she must not eat. This ritual is performed by men. 2. Main plant to thatch roof of local houses. 3. Collect the dry stems, tie together, use as a torch at night for walking or walking along the reef when fishing. 4. Take 1 cane and tie the leaves together and tie on a tree to indicate tabu – e.g. a citrus tree that will be ripe soon to tell people not to pick it. 5. To catch crabs just before sunset, burn the torch and shake the ashes on the rocks; come back an hour or so later and the crabs are attracted by the ashes and you can collect them. 6. Can also use to weave walls of house. 7. Women clean the leaves of the stem and use the hard part of the stem to strip pandanus leaf before weaving a basket. 8. Cut wild cane in half and sharpen the end, use this to cut the dried pandanus leaves into small strips. 9. Tie leaves into a knot and stick the knot on the kava stem; t is means that this kava goes “express” so the carrier goes to one border of a village and passes it to another person who knows it cannot stop in this village but goes to the next border and is passed on 10. This plant is a “message plant” to say “don’t stop,” referring to something being delivered.

nohos iseyna

nohos iseyna
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n. kind of banana

Example: Photo by K. David Harrison, April 2016.

nohos u nekrei

n. the flying-fox banana

nohwanopou

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n. kind of shellfish

nuarin abras

n. cliff

numnava

n. kind of sugarcane

puarapuanan par lei

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[puarapuanan par lei] phr. he went there and he took it

tedtedwaleg

n. kind of plant, grass, or fern

ugnis

v.a. to take off sprouts of taro