An example search has returned 100 entries

a’pei

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v. scrape ashes off (of roasted taro)

ahwai lelcai

v. to plant weeds; to make a wilderness or a waste

anhas

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n. Futunas (bad)

asvii

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v. break soft things (like bread, cassava, taro, etc.); cut in half

asvii nareto

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[asvii naret̚o] phr. break bread

atamod

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v. cut

añak

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pro. me

ero

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[eroʊ] num. two

et amai kava

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[et amai kava] phr. he chews kava

et atpu an

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[et at̚pu an] phr. he is hiding

et atut

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[et atut] phr. is running

et haklin an

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[et haklin an] phr. he is small

imiga

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n. kind of bird

incat

n. flax

inceideuc

n. the white wood of a tree

inceimu

inceimu

n. shrub to treelet, 3 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3265)

Example: Used as a leaf compost for planting taro, layered on the bottom of the hole and covering the taro as well.

incesmetaig

n. kind of sugarcane

incowos

incowos
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n. herb to 1. 5 m, flowers white with pink tips. Growing on sandy path along coastal walk to ute. (collection: Michael J. Balick #4989)

Example: The leaves of this plant are used to finish the ridge of the house roof. Lay the leaves horzontally on top of the roof, and the sides of the roof are thatched with palms or grass. Layer 10 leaves on top of each other to enable this part of the roof (known as nitjintiniom) to last for a long time--perhaps up to 6 years. If this is used on the top of a roof where there is a fire burning, such as a kitchen, and this leaf gets a lot of smoke, it can last much longer a the top of the roof--perhaps 10 years or more.

incowos ates

incowos ates
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n. herb, 2 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3676)

inhachac

inhachac
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n. herb, growing in partially drained marsh. Flowers purple. (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3596)

inhelja

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[inhɛlʤa] n. our penis’

inhubej

n. calabash

inhujac

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n. kind of shellfish

inhutlavlav

n. a bamboo flute

injivij

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n. kind of fish

injuki

n. the afternoon

injupki

n. afternoon

inlac

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n. kind of shellfish

inlepei u inpoded

inlepei u inpoded
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n. epiphyte, growing in dense rainforest. (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #4104)

Example: 1. This plant is considered bad luck when hunting or fishing. When doing these activities, do not decorate your hair with them. 2. This plant is used to weave the sheath portion of "nambas". First the stems are retted, then the inner portion of the plant removed. Once removed, the sheath is woven with the blanched fiber. 3. This is considered the male version of this plant. See GMP #4105, Phlegmarius sp. for the female version.

inlepei u inpoded atamaiñ

inlepei u inpoded atamaiñ
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n. epiphyte on main trunk (near base) of large tree, growing in dense rainforest. (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #4060)

inlopot jap

inlopot jap
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n. shrub to 1 m, flower white (collection: Michael J. Balick #4866)

Example: When making a taro patch, and removing soil, add the leaves of this plant to the soil to fertilize the taro, and prevent the bottom part of the taro from rotting. Put a layer of leaves on the bottom of the patch before planting taro and covering with soil.

inmac

inmac
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n. large tree, 20 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3529)

Example: 1. The inner bark of this plant is used as a general rope; peel it and weave it into rope, and use it to tie beams in the house. 2. The wood is good to start fires by rubbing two pieces together.

inmenyau

inmenyau
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[inmenyau] n. Brown Goshawk

Example: Brown Goshawk juvenile. Photo by Graham Winterflood, License: CC BY-SA 2.0 via Flickr

inmeranauunse

n. kind of breadfruit

inp̃alanhas

inp̃alanhas
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n. tree to 5 m, dbh 6 cm (collection: Michael J. Balick #4965)

Example: This plant is grown as an ornamental plant, and its flowers are used in the house. The stems are also cut for firewood.

inwouse

inwouse
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n. creeping and decumbent vine, growing at edge of strand (near airstrip terminal). (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3575)

inyat

inyat
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n. tree, 15 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #4082)

Example: 1. The trunk is used to produce timber.

inyirigwai

n. kind of plant, grass, or fern

iñec

[iŋec] n. Mystery Island

kaihec

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[kajheɣ] phr. Good bye.

katamari

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n. kind of bird

kerehed

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n. kind of crab

mas

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v. die

naetau

naetau
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n. kind of flowering plant (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #4766)

nagaho

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n. kind of crab

nagai

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n. kind of shellfish

naheñ

naheñ
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n. saplings, 3-6 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3715)

Example: Small poles from this plant are used to make fishing spears, and larger stems used for house rafters.

nahraren nepig

n. dawn of day

nalas

nalas
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n. kind of flowering plant (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #4755)

napat apeig

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[napat apeiŋ] n. black cloud

napat irenmejup

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[napat irenmeʤup] n. smooth, small cloud

napijelcau

n. kind of banana

napujatha

napujatha
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n. herb to 0. 75 m, fruits brown. Growing in cultivated area near village. (collection: Michael J. Balick #5011)

Example: People use this for an uspecified medicine.

napuleklek

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n. kind of crab

napupwi a darumea

n. kind of sugarcane

narasen atini

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[narasɛn natimi] n. skin (human)

narectejed

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n. kind of crab

narutu matua

n. wind-related term; no definition provided

nauwainapit

n. lightning

necec

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n. kind of crab

necye

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n. yellow and black fish

necye

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n. yellow star

necñopod

necñopod
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n. shrub, somewhat scandent (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3443)

nedoun

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[nɛθoʊn] n. foot, leg

nedwodou

nedwodou
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n. tree, 10 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3531)

Example: 1. For a child around 1 year of age, take the inside bark, mash it, boil in hot warter and then use it to wash the child. This will ensure that the child will grow strong and make them able to crawl fast. 2. If a woman who is one month pregnant would like to have a baby, she is given 4 of the tips of the branches to chew and swallow everything before breakfast 1x only. 3. For fishing, take 4 leaves, hold top side up, tear right half of leaves off, keep left side, roll it up and put with fishing gear to have good luck when fishing in the deep sea beyond the reef.

nefelelicai acen

n. hemlock

negaivaine

n. a bunch of grapes; also "nigaivaine"

neihon

n. a chewing of wood, and spitting it on sick people, to cure them; also "naihon"

nejeg

nejeg
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n. tree, growing in forest at edge of wide tidal stream (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3535)

Example: 1. The wood is strong and good to make house posts. People use these for this purpose on the coast as salt water does not bother this wood. 2. People eat fruit, split fruit in half, carefully scrape the inner part into a pot of water, keep over night – next day rinse, fry or cook with coconut milk and can add tinned tuna for example, very hard work.

nekel

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n. kind of bird

nekinkin

n. kind of plant, grass, or fern

nekro

nekro
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n. tree to 8 m, dbh 20 cm (collection: Michael J. Balick #4916)

Example: Boil inner bark in seawater to treat scabies, a skin condition. Take one handful of bark and put in one liter of water, wash the affected area once daily for a week .

nemtanla

nemtanla
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n. herb to 1 m, flowers yellow. (collection: Michael J. Balick #4892)

Example: If a person is coming to a "new" village, e.g. not their own, and they have a branch in their hand, it means that they are coming in peace and not trying to harm anyone else in the new village. Or if they are asking for something that might be found in the new village, they hold the branch of this species and pass it to a person from that village so they will accept you.

nepelcopei

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n. kind of bush

nepjenumu

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n. kind of shellfish

neroa

neroa
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n. tree to 5 m, dbh 12 cm (collection: Michael J. Balick #4917)

Example: Flowers are used to decorate the house and other areas as they are very fragrant. The leaves are used to cover taro cooked in an earth oven.

nidin

n. sap

nidou

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n. kind of shellfish

nidwunitei

nidwunitei
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n. terrestrial fern, 1. 5 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #4047)

nigirid

nigirid
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n. tree, 2 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3479)

Example: The leaves of this plant are used in cooking, particuarly with the earth oven. Use a fire to heat stones, then when the fire burns down and the stones are hot, pile these leaves on top of the hot stones and then place the food being cooked--taro, fish, pig, cassava, banana or other foods--on top of the leaves. Then pile more of these leaves on top of the food and then place additional hot stones on top of that pile of leaves. While the food is cooking--each type of food takes a different amount of time--the leaves give off a very nice smell and help flavor the food. The young stems of this plant are used in home construction but as they are small and thin, they are not used for posts.

nigyi neto

n. the chewed fiber of sugarcane

nijcel

nijcel
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n. tree, 7-8 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3587)

Example: 1. If the preferred banana leaves are not available to wrap food for cooking, then use young leaves of this species and tie taro and fish for cooking. 2. Use leaves to wrap fresh water prawns and fresh water fish and cook them on charcoal. Use as a cup by making funnel out of leaf and drink from it. 3. Used for unspecified ritual activities.

nikwunitei

nikwunitei
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n. small tree-fern, 1 m tall (collection: Gregory M. Plunkett #3269)

nilit

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n. kind of shellfish

nimtahuged

n. the holes in a coconut

nipjinamesei

nipjinamesei
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n. Honeycomb grouper

Example: Photo by Jeffrey T. Williams / Smithsonian Institution, License: CC BY-SA 3.0 via Fishes of Australia

nisil

n. the center rib of the coconut leaflet; wire

nitato

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[nitaʔto] v. to bake

nohatag

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[nowataŋ] n. sky

nohos

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n. banana (gen.)

nowangat

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[nowanɣat] n. pandanus fruit (sg)

nowei yag

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[noweɪ yaŋ] n. July (lit. a kind of wood when it’s leaves become yellow)

nuarin adalamak

n. plain

nupsi itai

n. corn

nusjakai

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n. kind of fish (folk name)

pok

adv. seaward

pokmi

adv. seaward here

sepam

adv. down here

tite

adj. ripe early in the season

ugnis

v.a. to take off sprouts of taro